Chevron taps Baker Hughes for Jansz-Io Subsea Compression Manifold

August 10, 2021

Credit: Chevron
Credit: Chevron

Oilfield services firm Baker Hughes has won a contract with Chevron to deliver subsea compression manifold technology for the Jansz-Io Compression (J-IC) project offshore W. Australia.

Using its Subsea Connect early engagement approach, Baker Hughes will provide Chevron with a subsea compression manifold structure (SCMS) including module and foundation, as well as the horizontal clamp connector system and subsea controls for the manifold structure.

The contract comes after Chevron last month agreed to proceed with the $4 billion (AU$6 billion). Jansz-Io Compression (J-IC) project development.Jansz-Io Compression project - Subsea Compression Station. Photo: Chevron

The Jansz–Io gas fields are located within production licenses WA‐36‐L, WA‐39‐L, and WA‐40‐L approximately 200 km off the north‐west coast of Western Australia in water depths of approximately 1,350 meters.

The Jansz-Io field is a part of the Chevron-operated Gorgon natural gas facility, one of the world’s largest natural gas developments. Baker Hughes has previously provided 23 subsea trees, 12 subsea manifolds, 45 subsea structures, and a subsea production control system for the Gorgon natural gas facility.

The Chevron-operated Gorgon natural gas facility is a joint venture between the Australian subsidiaries of Chevron (47.3%), ExxonMobil (25%), Shell (25%), Osaka Gas (1.25%), Tokyo Gas (1%) and JERA (0.417%).

As part of the project, Norway's Aker Solutions confirmed last month it had secured a contract from Chevron to provide a subsea gas compression system for the project.




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