Rigless intervention

June 26, 2012

Baker Hughes’ new Mastiff mechanized, self-pinning rigless intervention system (RIS) provides operators with an alternative method for carrying out pipe installation and retrieval operations that typically require an offshore rig, helping to reduce the cost of abandonment, workover and drive pipe pre-installation operations. According to Baker Hughes, the Mastiff is easily deployed worldwide and its modular design and light weight make it ideal for operations on platforms with limited load capacity. With a maximum weight of 24,000lbs, each RIS module can be transported in a standard 40ft open-top container.

The self-pinning mast erection system improves safety and enables the unit to be rigged up or rigged down in 24-48 hours. Hydraulics built into the system enable the modular components to be assembled and disassembled using a hydraulic, self-pinning design, eliminating the need for riding belt operations. The sturdy mast is said to enable safe operation at wind speeds of up to 50mph.

The system has a 352t pulling capacity. While performing conductor pipe removal, the Mastiff RIS can support cutting and pulling lifts of 50ft sections of 36in conductor pipe, inner casing and cement, a significant improvement over casing jack systems, which work with 5ft sections.

As an alternative to well abandonment, the Mastiff can be used to initiate a slot recovery program for continued field development prior to the arrival of the drilling rig. Once the pipe is removed, the well slot can be prepared for a new, full-sized wellbore using a full-range of equipment from drive-pipe whipstocks to hammer services, saving valuable rig time.



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